Border

France/ UK, 2004
27 min. Digibeta PAL, Colour, Stereo

Directed, Produced, Written, Camera, Edited Laura Waddington
Co-produced Love Streams Agnes b. Paris
Music Simon Fisher Turner
Voice Laura Waddington

Premiere

The 57th Locarno International Film Festival, Switzerland, August 2004

Synopsis

In 2002, Laura Waddington spent months in the fields around Sangatte Red Cross camp, France with Afghan and Iraqi refugees, who were trying to cross the channel tunnel to England. Filmed at night with a small video camera, the figures lit only by the distant car headlights on the motorways, Border is a personal account of the refugees’ plight and the police violence that followed the camp’s closure.

Director’s statement

In the days, if you wandered along the motorways and the wastelands, you could see the refugees everywhere: waiting on the roadside or headed to the port and the freight trains. They travelled in twos or threes or sometimes in groups of twenty or thirty. 
At night, I’d walk along the roads with them. It took two or three hours to reach the spots on the channel tunnel fence, where they’d start to cut the wire. Then came the arrests and the police bus back to the camp. A few hours later, they’d re-emerge and the perverse game of cat and mouse would start again. 
Most of the refugees were from Iraq and Afghanistan. They’d taken six or seven months to get to France, paying traffickers to smuggle them in trucks across Iran, Turkey and the Balkans. Many had nothing left but the clothes they were standing in. In their countries, they’d been teachers, university professors, medical students, and bricklayers. 
Some men died in the tunnel, others had their arms or legs cut off by the moving trains. I remember, one boy who lost his leg was out on the road, the week he was released from the hospital, trying to escape again. The months passed in limbo. I couldn’t believe we had just left them there, as if our backs were turned to them.

Laura Waddington 2002
 

Looking back on the making of “Border”

Whenever I sensed that an essential image was about to appear, I’d abruptly retreat deep into myself and impose a kind of inner stillness. During those shut off moments, I blocked out sound and the cold winds didn’t effect me, my hand providing a completely solid base for the camera to rest upon, although it would shake a lot as soon as the shot was over.

I remember the violent contrast between those moments of extreme immobility and silence, which passed, as if in a dream, everything abstract and in slow motion and the sudden bursts of frantic movement, bright light and police violence.

related passage in “Scattered Truth”


Press Quotes

“But the shock of the (Locarno film) festival is the cinema of Laura Waddington, 34 years old, English, she lived illegally in New York, then spent a few years travelling with the world’s exiles in the most dangerous places. Due to a plane phobia, she made these journeys on buses, cargo ships, hitchhiking. But aside from planes, Laura Waddington is afraid of nothing and her video camera carries all her courage and her conscience. Slung across her shoulder. Border is the trace of the months she spent in Sangatte, hidden in the fields, each night, with Afghan and Iraqi refugees. Shot secretly, the shutter wide open, almost in slow motion, the images create an aesthetic experience of fear, of terror, as if fallen out of a nightmare, peopled with out of focus figures. Border links the fields of Sangatte to that terrified part of our imagination, hidden deep within all of us.”
read article
Philippe Azoury, LIBERATION, Paris

“A thousand miles away from the television reports that vainly try to give a hypothetical identity to these displaced bodies, Laura Waddington’s desperate camera scrupulously avoids the refugees’ faces to convey an animal condition, a status of hunted beasts. Nothing predatory, no social dogma, just real empathy in this worried and audacious filming. And if the image is superb, at times pushing Border towards the boundaries of video dance and thus annoying certain guards of the temple of ethics, this is primarily due to a technical necessity, the DV camera’s shutter wide open to compensate for the lack of light, resulting in a large trembling grain, an impression of slow motion, movements like so many imprints.”
Bertrand Loutte, LES INROCKUPTIBLES, Paris

“Subtle and powerful, the work of this English filmmaker, nomadic observer of the world and devoted translator of fear and hope, as in the film Border (International Competition/ Special Mention) a tragic document about the powerless attempts of Afghan and Iraqi refugees to escape from France to England and the violent police repression that followed the closure of the camp of Sangatte.”
Elena Marcheschi, IL MANIFESTO, Italy

“Set only in the wide open, with refugees, silhouettes in the sheltering darkness, moving in the wind and the rain, crossing landscapes, anonymous to the eye yet known by name to the narrator, Laura Waddington… There’s a heroic compassion of quasi-Kurosawa’ian dimensions to each image, a justness to each movement that in its humbleness speaks gloriously of all the growth and learning done in all those years on the road.”
read article
Olaf Möller , THE DAYS AND YEARS OF MY TRAVELS, The 51st Pesaro Film Fest Catalogue 2005

“Have the fireflies disappeared? Of course not. Some of them are very close to us, they brush against in the dark: others have gone over the horizon, to try to rebuild elsewhere their community, their minority, their shared desire. Here remain for us the images of Laura Waddington and the names – in the end credits – of all those whom she met. We can watch the film again, we can give it to others to watch, we can circulate fragments, that will give rise to others; firefly-images.”
read book passage
Georges Didi-Huberman, SURVIVANCE DES LUCIOLES, Les Éditions de Minuit, Paris, 2009

“The images in Border, pregnant with pathos, shaky and shaking their audience… search for a new formula of community based around sharing a common space and a gaze that would take the gaze of the other into account. These, as Sergey Eisenstein would say, “inspired images of audiovisual exaltation” emerge… from a place where politics is born, even though it is not called politics and has no representatives.”
read article
Paweł Mościcki, THE IMAGE AS COMMON GOOD: ON LAURA WADDINGTON’S BORDER, Widok, Poland, 2016


Awards

Grand Prix Experimental-essai-art video, Cote Court, France
First Prize Videoex 2005, Festival of  Experimental Film and Video Zurich, Switzerland
Special Mention Ecumenical Jury, The 51st Oberhausen International Short Film Festival, Germany

Desist Film’sTop 50 Films of All Time


Screenings

The 57th Locarno International Film Festival, Switzerland, August 2004 (World premiere)
The 33rd Montreal Festival of New Cinema and New Media, Canada, 2004
The 19th Festival International du Film de Belfort, France, 2004
The Human Rights Film Festival, Zagreb, Croatia, 2004
The 36th International Film Festival Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 2005
The 59th Edinburgh International Film Festival, Scotland, 2005
The European Parliament, Brussels, 2005
“La Semaine des realisateurs, 2005” Fespaco, Ouagadougou, Burkinao Faso, 2005
The 51st Oberhausen International Short Film Festival, Germany,  2005
The 12th New York Video Festival 2005, Film Society of Lincoln Center, New York, 2005
One World, 7th International Human Rights Documentary Film Festival, Prague, 2005
The Images Festival, 18th Edition, Toronto, Canada, 2005
“Cine y Casi Cine”, The Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, 2005
The 6th Seoul Film Festival, South Korea, “Manifesta”, 2005
Le 28ème Festival du Court Métrage de Clermont-Ferrand, France, 2006
The 21st Mar del Plata International Film Festival, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 2006
“Vidéo et après: Laura Waddington” Musée National d’art moderne, Centre Pompidou, Paris, November 2006


Collection

Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Pompidou, Paris
Bibliothèque Nationale de France, BnF, Paris
International Film Festival Oberhausen, Film and video archive, Germany
Cité Nationale de l’Histoire de l’Immigration, Paris
The Cinematheque de Tangiers, Morocco
INVIDEO Archive A.I.A.C.E, Milan, Italy
Bibliothèque de l’Université Laval, Quebec, Canada
Bibliothèque de l’Ecole supérieure des Beaux-Arts, Nimes, France
Bibliotheque de l’Universite de Geneve, Switzerland
Texas A&M University Library, Texas, US


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